Honestly, I’m not a nomad*….

…but I’m on the move again.  Due to unforeseen circumstances I’m making the move back to Hampshire from Nottingham, only 8 short months after I moved up.  The only thing I will say about the move is that it wasn’t my choice, and that fact is making packing rather difficult.  Packing to move up here was comparatively easy and a joyful task compared to packing to take what at times seems like a backwards (and completely surreal) step.

Continue reading

Still here!

Forgive me bloggers for I have sinned; it has been 11-weeks since my last confession….

But, oh! what an 11-weeks it has been!

My last post on here was 21st March; in which I was suffering a mild setback from “doing a lot”.  To say that my last bout of “doing a lot” will knock my previous record out the water will be an understatement… Continue reading

Turning the frowns upside down

I have mentioned before that a HUGE tool in the kit of dealing with CFS is positivity.  On days like today it is difficult to remain positive in the face of disappointments.  This is how I try to turn my disappointments into positive reinforcements Continue reading

Fast is the new…. Fast!

Forgive me friends it has been 66 days since my last blog.

Going back to my last blog, on 7th Jan, I was 7-days into the Fast Diet (or 5:2 Diet) and was feeling superb.  Fast forward to today and I am only just finding time to sit down and update you all on my progress. Continue reading

What a difference a day makes

24 little hours | Brought the sunshine and flowers | where there used to be rain
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So says the song.
And it is true. A better nights sleep thanks to the decline of the cough (still there but not ‘wring you out and keep you awake’ violent coughing like before) and glorious sunshine and I feel refreshed and recharged. Continue reading

Absent Note

I’ve been trying to write loads of meaningful, insightful, highly intelligent posts lately but they have all failed due to lack of energy and brain-fuge.

However, I thought I’d better pop by and do more than read my feed: explain why I’ve been away for a while.  Firstly, work has picked up since the new year and I’ve been busy, busy, busy with phone calls around the world and stuff like that.  Secondly, and perhaps not unrelated to the first, Continue reading

Decisions, Decisions!

One of the most frustrating things about having CFS is having to make decisions on what I do and don’t do in any one day/week.

In my mind, now that I am out of the dark days of hypothyroid and CFS induced fugue, I am no different to how I was in my gap year (scarily, 17 years and half my lifetime ago now) before I had Glandular Fever where I would work shifts – either early 6am-2pm or late 2-10pm – ride the horse most weekdays as well as going jive dancing 2-3 times a week. Continue reading

Same but different

As I sit here at my newly re-vamped desk, typing on my new computer (laptop finally becoming more limited by age than was good for work) and with the cat curled up in one of her favourite spots – tucked up my jumper – Continue reading

Time and Motion

I’m away house/dog sitting again this week and, as happened last time, I realise that I have let my step-count dwindle since I stopped wearing my pedometer every day.  It is difficult when I am working hard to build up my business which is mainly desk-based.

I have always struggled with working hard at work and working to maintain my fitness; getting home (or leaving the home office) after a busy day leaves you reaching for the quick and easy choice for supper, which is not always the healthiest choice.  When dragging your tired body out of bed ready to start another busy day the last thing I want to do is jump on the cross-trainer, even though it is right by the bed (which I try and avoid looking at so as to not feel guilty).  You may have the time, but don’t have the energy or you may have the energy but not the time.

I have been keeping up with the riding, which at times has been the one thing that gets me going through the day: my “raison d’etre” when I wonder what all the hard work is for.  I’m really enjoying the ‘map my run’ app on my phone and using it to track the rides we go out on – especially useful for tracking the fitness of the horses too, giving top and average speeds and an accurate track of our mileage (then you realise that the dog has also been coming with us on our 7-8 mile rides).  Having kept up with the riding, which is good all over exercise, I’m not so unprepared for the dog walking I do when I’m dog-sitting but I do need to make sure that I do 20 minutes on the cross trainer every day.

I haven’t been doing my EAP exercises, although I have been trying to stick to the nutritional plan and last week I had lost another couple of inches although the weight hadn’t changed much.  Not sure what this week’s measurements are going to bring as I fell off the wheat wagon and am struggling to get back on the straight and narrow.  I always find it difficult with the change in the seasons, not that we’ve really had a summer to speak of, when the nights draw in.

Since receiving my diagnosis of CFS and getting set on the road to recovery, I have always known that I need to prioritise my fitness as equally important as my work because without maintaining my fitness, I will not have the stamina and energy to do my work.  I have always hoped to be able to work not-quite full time in order to devote some of the time that would normally be spent working to building and maintaining my fitness.  However, to get to that point working for yourself means that you have to work more than full time to initially build up your client base which adds an extra challenge.

I’m now 3-years on from my diagnosis of Hypothyroidism and CFS and sometimes can’t believe how far I’ve come: from someone who was not far off being bed-ridden to someone who would be considered ‘moderately active’ (or ‘Active’ when I keep up with my step-count).  I still have a way to go to get to the level of fitness I want but when I worry that I won’t be able to get there, I just have to look at what I have already achieved – and also at the determination that kept me going before my diagnosis – and I know I can do it.   I hope it doesn’t take me another three years to get there but if it does then it does and it’s still a great achievement.